Deep Point of View

Not long ago, I learned about deep point of view. The three types that writers use to get into the characters heads. Love it. Creates a depth to characters whom readers can relate to and love. Too much can be … too much. It’s all about balance.

Deep POV is a great way to build an audience. I tire and forget novelists who write characters without this. Deep POV grabs you by the collar and doesn’t let go.

I rewrote an entire manuscript to take me out of the work. Put each sight/sound/emotion into characters internal thought, action, or dialogue. Some telling is important, yes. But author intrusion or shallow writing is forgettable reading.

One critiquer demanded I rewrite the end or she’d go all ‘Misery’ on me. I didn’t give her my address. She realized it was a HEA for now, and forgave me. My editor told me I had to rewrite. She cried. Three times, in the same chapter. Her last statement was, ‘I don’t know if I edited anything, I cried so much. I will be thinking of Calhoun and Cade for a long time.’ YES!

The terror, the anger, the angst, and loss. I want my writing to sing and my readers to be there … to laugh, feel anger, cry. When my critiquers argue inline with my characters, I know I’ve done my job. Grab those readers. This is what makes an author memorable because there is a takeaway message.

If you don’t know about deep point of view (aka deep POV), find it. Steve Laube Agency today wrote on this. Scribophile has a great section and group dedicated to deep point of view.

Deep point of view takes us into the thoughts, actions, and emotion of the character. He/she has to overcome a personal obstacle to address the inciting factor pulling said character into resolving the obstacle. It is always about the character. If characters have no physical, emotional flaws, then they are shallow, forgettable, and off I go to the next book, hoping to relate to the character. You find deep POV in their actions, thoughts, expressions, dialogue, environments. Don’t narrate, please.

I might add … Scribophile has resources on filtering, show/tell, different point of view, style and honest critiques.

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