Brad Carl Does it Again!

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I had the utmost pleasure of reading 6 in the Styx, a collection of short stories by Brad Carl. Brad has skills. The launch date for 6 in the Styx is coming soon. So scribble it down on your wish list.

6 In The Styx - Brad Carl

And for this, I hate him. NO.. just kidding. I really enjoy his lighthearted morbid sense of humor that I have also found in Grey Areas, the Saga, novel length.

Grey Areas - The Saga - Brad Carl

But back to 6 in the Styx. It’s a collection of short stories that follow the worst moments of six different people, and some don’t even realize it. When you read these stories, you’ll likely think the same things I did. My reactions to their situation, hapless, hopeless, cluelessness, my schadenfreude and near-reverence for Brad’s writing style.

God, I hate him… No.. aah, just kidding.

hate you again congratulations

As a writer, I read everything in my path, including Lysol cans and other deadly poisons…

wide eye

I MEAN.. books. But reading a wide variety of styles not only improves your vocabulary, it can give you bumps, chills and a very odd sense of humor.

Of course, you could be born that warped. I am pretty sure Brad was. No. He was.

wonder

You can find Brad Carl here: http://bradcarl.com/

Twitter: @BradCarl22

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BradCarlAuthor/

Brad Carl

And in my possession is Craft Beer Burning, a murder mystery. I can hardly wait to open the pages. In the meantime, readers, you have your mission. And… you will accept it. Because… you know you want to.

mission impossible

Unlike this one, this WordPress message will self-destruct, like… never.

mission impossible self destruct

 

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Wisdom from Kristen Lamb

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This is another good post from the insane, I mean … wise Kristen Lamb’s blog. These are editing tips you do not want to skip.

Why… Pay… More?

kill bill

So slash those sweet lil’ things you love so much. Hey, I had to, and it … sucked.

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2018/04/self-editing-writers/#comment-92608

Don’t blink. Save them in another folder if you can’t let go, but … <pulls pages from your hands> Just Do It. Stop thinking.

wonder

Dopamine and social media

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OK

Gone for the day. Social media is sucking up what’s left of my soul and I have no desire to fall into pools or poles for that matter, no matter how awesome the text.

Can I go for at least an hour without  (addictive as heroin, cocaine, cigarettes) checking my sites? Not even texting.

See you in a few. Days. Maybe hours. Minutes?

Forensics -Computerized Reconstruction Webinar / and Part Deux of Autopsy for Fiction

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Always looking for something new and cool, I was sent this webinar registration coming up for the reconstruction of the fragments of skeleton remains. No, not the gif…

skeletons dancing

Reconstruction of complete skeletal remains has been notoriously difficult to do, and incredibly time-consuming for the ever-so patient puzzle reconstructionist, backlogged in many cases. The fragments are often shattered bone, nothing left intact. Think ‘Fargo.’

author fargo woodchipper scene

If you are fascinated / obsessed with forensics, you will want to see the latest of technology that will be available to the uh, FBI near you if you currently live on the East Coast (where it is first going to be available) … register and watch this webinar. Might wanna take notes. This technology comes from several sources, putting ‘Bones’ almost in the realm of reality.

I’m such a tease, but below is the information.

author funny tease

Coming in May: https://rticqpub1.connectsolutions.com/content/connect/c1/7/en/events/event/shared/1178106013/event_landing.html?sco-id=1222260295&_charset_=utf-8

Registration is free, but you get to go through the series of questions. I simply add that I am a writer… so don’t sweat it. But I’d recommend hurrying on that, and if you have police/crime scene background, please use that instead of writer/author, I’d hate to get the whole group kicked out ’cause of that.

***And … to continue from Part One of yesterday’s post on Autopsy. I went through dialogue with two views of an autopsy scene: first from the professional, the information to skull and on down. The second on the newbie’s near loss of stomach contents et. al. while presented with her first degloved head during the dissection.

Needless to say, later in the narrative between her and partner, keeping her eyes on the victim’s painted toenails prove some evidence down the line. Imagine that.

 author toenail polish

For the truly dedicated medical or non-medical writer … take the coolest, most old-school class from the recently passed Marian Diamond, who at 90 years old was one of the first to study Albert Einstein’s brain.. She taught anatomy and if you have an hour a day, watching her lectures are fascinating (and now, free). And yes, I went through the class (twice, because she is a legend). This is her class:

But for this portion of the Autopsy, let me break it down:

What reasons would the medical examiner, coroner, pathologist be required to be present (or at least, highly recommended) at the crime scene? Answer? Depends.

author ducky very good .. doctor

If the pathologist/coroner/medical examiner (these terms are not interchangeable, you may have to Google … or DuckDuckGo the terms…  (sorry I had an NCIS moment; I will be going with ‘Pathologist’ to cover all from here on) doesn’t follow up with correct procedure, well… imagine the media fallout, the legal ramifications, the civil lawsuits against the police station, the innocent imprisoned, the serial killer who goes free, the family who cannot have closure.

  1. The bizarre nature of the murder(s)
  2. Prominent/high profile victims (and suspect)
  3. Jurisdiction
  4. Difficulty in identifying weapon i.e. having to use an FBI weapons https://archives.fbi.gov/archives/about-us/lab/forensic-science-communications/fsc/april2000/schehl1.htm  (this is part one, there are more, another great resource).
  5. Serial/multiple deaths and backlogged cases that require immediate evaluation of the victim at the scene. You do not want your main character-detective evading the first walk-through without a pathologist at the scene
  6. Correct and quick collection of fragments of cloth for processing
  7. Deaths without clear determination
  8. TOD (aka Time of Death)
  9. Deaths that take place in a prison–this would be a state issue… your local coroner will not be an adequate resource. Perhaps one of the most scrutinized cases that must have access to a knowledgeable medical examiner (or group!)
  10. Recovery of unusual evidence (you’ll know it when you write it… or see it… or read about); supervise collection of teeth, bones; evaluation of victim, possibly being moved and fire death scenes.
  11. Crash scenes; airplane crashes will include the FAA and every other ABC agency so, get it right.
  12. Recovery of buried remains (important items may well be buried under the corpse/skeleton, maybe another body, perhaps clothes with viable (who knows?) DNA evidence.
  13. Educational for weird s*** (stuff) to show future / budding medical examiners.
  14. Any other case that the detective/CSU has questions about. There is so many reasons to have/must have a pathologist, one might just call the pathologist, anyway. Do not wake the pathologist up when a ninety-year old cancer patient in a nursing home passes away in their sleep. Don’t, just… do not. If you are writing from the pathologist’s point of view, and want to make him/her grumpy, that’s the perfect way to go about him/her hating the detective…

*Muy Importante!*

Rules!

author cartoon lecture no sense

Each state has it’s own laws… you may find these are standardized soon under the auspices of the FBI. permission to do an autopsy is not an individual’s verbal/written consent. The autopsy is performed based on findings at the scene per dictated by state law.

The Prelim:

  1. Don’t forget the written reports, the computer entries, x-rays, photographs from the scene. The body at this point has been moved to the morgue. The official autopsy begins here, while a cursory may be done (especially in fiction for sake of brevity) at the scene i.e. time of death determination.
  2. Let’s go with the external examination. Glove up and don the rest of your personal protection equipment per OSHA guidelines. This is the walk around. What does the victim look like at the scene? Now, the body is on the table before the clothes are washed, the finger/toenails evaluated, photographed and scraped? Before the particulates are removed and collected?
  3. Determine victim’s approximate age, developmental status, height, weight. Dental x-rays can be compared (if available) to the x-rays obtained at time of autopsy.
  4. Look for old injuries that are obvious, bruising. Photograph tattoos, identifying marks, tool patterns and evaluate the possible weapon. If your victim is killed while crawling in mud, the spatter and pattern of the weapon may appear different.
  5. Fingerprints can be collected (yes! No, not old school, not without some chemical help).
  6.  Collect particulates carefully from hair. Also… yay… bugs. If you have to, collect a lot of these bugs. You may need a lot. Later on the margaritas of collecting bug juices <watches people run to bathroom to vomit> Ya’ll back now? Okay.
  7. The walk-around complete, let you tech collect, bag and get your signature as well as his/hers, and time to be sent to the CSU lab. Remove your personal protection gear you are wearing, gown, gloves, clean up, and wait while your tech washes the body. Have your margarita…the correct one… j/k.
  8. While the wash-down is going on and you are not having a PB&J sandwich, evaluate the x-rays. Are there pins, screws, joint replacements, pacemaker? Old/new fractures? Any prosthesis surgically placed will have identifying information, in the event your story includes an unknown victim. Look for opaque objects, bullets, bits of metal.

Internal Exam: (Dear Lord in Heaven when was she going to get here?)

In most fiction, the prelim, while important, can be summed up with the words, “Didn’t find blah blah blah in the prelim. During the internal exam, however…”

If your crime-fighting hero/heroine is the main character, don’t forget the prelim. ‘Gathered are precious pearls hiding in plain view…’  Quote ~ (Not really) Yoda

The internal exam also includes evaluating external signs of rigor mortis and lividity.

You’ll recognize rigor mortis as soon as you see it, er your pathologist or detective, and lividity when the body is turned over. Rigor mortis (aka ‘rigor’) is muscle stiffening after death when the body stops making substances that keep you in motion and your muscles, joints movable. No, older people are not in rigor mortis. Yeesh. Unless of course, they are recently dead like, in the past two days.

Rigor begins the process at approximately two hours after death. Stiffening increases from eight to twelve hours at the peak, and gradually decreases over thirty-six to forty-eight hours.

Livor mortis (lividity) is something of great interest to your detective during the process of walking the scene. This process begins thirty minutes after the heart stops, and the victim’s blood follows gravity, appearing purplish. If your victim has lividity to the stomach yet you find him/her lying on his/her back, the body has been moved, because there is a time limit. Six hours, and lividity is fixed.

Now, evaluate the scalp to toes, noting head, neck, spine, thorax, abdomen for wound size, type: from a bullet? trajectory and ‘obvious’ wound tract’; then internally.

Start with a liver temperature. This with rigor and livor mortis helps the timeline. Bugs help, also. Ahem. But have your pathologist look for and obtain objects that do not belong in a body. Ever. Bullets, metal fragments, spears, surgical instruments or car keys left there during surgery (haven’t heard of car keys just yet), cellphones, surgical gauze (happens all the time) micro chips swallowed by the victim to hide evidence, jewelry, potatoes & other veggies… (found in nether regions), light bulbs (found), coke bottles (found again in the down under), drugs (and … done). I have seen some interesting things in fiction. ‘Sideways Eight’ by AJ Wallace comes to mind. Brow-raising and well, downright entertaining things found in places, well, thanks AJ, things one can never un-see.

If your story has a separate CSU department, they will receive clothing to serum. The will assess in depth, and for brevity, your story may diverge here: “The lab found animal blood on the clothes, dirt from the scene, but …” However, you know what’s gone on in your writer’s brain, and only add what pushes your plot forward. My medical examiner explains he found a substance in the vitreous humor, and your reader may not know what this is, so then, neither does the detective (for the reader’s sake) and has to ask, ‘what is the vit…?’ Grumpy pathologist reports ,’Gooey eyeball stuff.’ But what’s found in the gooey eyeball stuff plays into the story.

This way, you haven’t lost your reader to watch Marian Diamond’s lectures.

There are a few different techniques (Rokinansky, Virchow) on performing autopsies. I prefer to vary my pathologist’s methods largely because I want my characters, including the pathologists (whether main character or not) to have their own professional quirks. This means, some start with the cranial evaluation and work their way down, removing, weighing and measuring the organs, while another method leaves everything in place and evaluates right there. Both are fine, but there are pitfalls and benefits to both.

Leaving everything in place helps the pathologist assess each organ as it sits … and find the wound tract. But those organs are slippery little buggers, and the pathologist could potentially accidentally ruin a wound tract. On the other hand, removing each organ by snipping it loose can damage a portion of a wound not seen while removing organs; though evaluation of stomach contents, and other wounds i.e. to the lungs, heart, etc., are measured easily. Or with slightly less slippage…

(There are the med student clinical methods [dissections] that follow along with the anatomy class and are part of a year long anatomy class. [I have a website for that, too, if you are interested] but dissections are not the same as an autopsy. There is a thirty minute graphic Spanish speaking autopsy, well done, trust me, you will know what / how an autopsy can be done with a soup ladle, a measuring cup, a butcher knife, and a hammer… That is how it is done in parts of Mexico.

author soup ladle

And at the end of that thirty minute video you will know what the Y cut is, the evaluation of the viscera and organs, finding the wound tract, and where the bullet entered the heart. But you may want to know just where to get that Ginsu knife for your next Thanksgiving bird, because he was able to slice through the skull and still thinly slice that brain like a pastrami loaf… You’ll also know what [without needing translation] a degloved head looks like, like my detective in Nobody Girl and the pathologist in How to Steal a Romance.)

Now evaluate the wound tract. Make certain specimens are collected from the eyes (vitreous humor–contains chemicals that can be evaluated to compare to tissue, organs and blood). Collect hair from scalp, pubic hair. Collect all specimens there. Measure blood loss before or after removing the viscera (fatty material plus the small, large intestines), and the stomach. And if not done yet, evaluate the vagina and anus, as well.

Now ya’ll might be thinking, so why do I have to take tissue samples from everything when the dude was obviously hit by a bus and his head crushed?

Well, good point, Dr. Watson.

author dr watson thinks hes over it

But … you’re wrong. What if your victim was hit by the bus not due to bus driver’s menacing or careless driving but because he had a brain tumor that caused confusion? And lookie there, right on the street, your CSU can gather that brain matter up for you. Now how bad would you feel if Mr. (or Ms.) Detective determined, and judge/jury locked up some poor schmuck for murder when it had everything to do with the victim’s health?

And how would Mr. (or Ms.) Detective feel if she didn’t check for psych records, mental status with the family? Hmm. You see where I am going. PLOT TWIST! Because homicide … it ain’t easy.

plot problem

And yep. Another post in a few days on what follows when your pathologist is done slicing and dicing.

editor halloween style

 

 

 

 

A Funny Reblog

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Kristen Lamb has blogging down.

Especially about serial killers, I MEAN writers. So, as a writer, I can relate. Reading her blog this afternoon just sent me into a fit of giggling.

I have read her blogs, and her fiction. She is an awesome serial killer, I MEAN writer, and if you aren’t following her, well, your loss. Give me a comment that you are not, and I may write you in as a … victim.

jason bourne

Read. Please. Before I add you to that list …

http://authorkristenlamb.com/2018/04/diagnosing-real-writer/  Continue reading

Writing, Critiquing, Beta and Launching

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Wow. What a list there.

listThe list may go on.

As I write, I look for those readers/writers for critiquing, and Beta before I send to editor. And then … launch (that does not mean, ‘to the moon, Alice, to the moon!’)

moon

Writing is my job.

jim carrey typing.gif

Critiquing is for … critique-ers – i.e. committed folks offering to suggest better sentence structure, grammar, and spelling, big plot holes. Pronouns with each sentence … i.e. I, I, I, or she, she, she … confusing statements, things slowing the plot down.

Beta readers are those committed folks who reads/swap novels to beta (or critique), and look for interest, pacing, plot holes and words like, ‘I would buy this.’ Or … ‘this sucks, start over, dump it,’ etc.

reading dog cartoon

Not the soul-sucking critiques/betas that pulverize the soul of the writer/author. Generally, in one’s genre or close to … or willing to suspend belief enough to read the work (and if you swap with me, I would do the same). But, honest. Above all honest and respectful. I have had the bashers, some with good points; good grief, leave the mean crap out. Not cool.

writer book sucks.gif

Then the launch. Meaning … I am now ready to sell that work. Add the novel to social media. All of the above willing to be part of it. Easy job. Post to your Twitter, Facebook, or whatever your favorite social media site(s).

When I review a book, launched, I hit all my sites. I give stars (honest) on Amazon (no stars if it requires work, at which time I send the author a note … this needs work, want another review?). I am a dedicated critique -er, Beta, and launcher, ARC reader and reviewer. It is what authors & readers do.

If you are interested in a dedicated swap, critique, beta, launch, these are free copies/swaps. I post via email to a group I dedicate, both readers only, writers only, both. And swapping novels. I have two more Betabook spots that are free. On my beta site I send chapters at a time since my current work is still … in the works.

writer reader dedicated

Let me know if you are interested. Send me that email, and I’ll answer and add you to my list of readers etc.,.

c.mahoney.fnp@gmail.com

Self Publishing. Is it up or down?

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Make Self-Publishing Mighty – Setting Goals

Claire O’Sullivan

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorClaire1/

Steps to publishing have many different routes, including (yay!) self-publishing. These free the writer from the constraints of the traditional route. I point to the length of time one may wait for agents/traditional houses to accept a novel. Not all (many) make it through slush pile(s). Indie is self-publishing peppered with a light to traditional publishing taste, except… different.

The cavalry has arrived. No, really. The cavalry is here and self -publishing, after several years, is gaining popularity. Again, yay! That cavalry is you. So this is a sexist image, but… okay, I think he’s hot.

cavalry

 

How does one enter the foray of fast growing market? As you read, don’t lose heart. It seems overwhelming for first time self-publishers. Self-publishing is a funny animal. It has ups. Then… downs. The market waxes and wanes.

These are the goals you must have to follow through. You are starting a business, and floundering around ends in ‘dead fish’ fodder.

While tempted to throw your first draft to a self-publishing outfit, don’t, have a cup of coffee. Do not pay an agent or publishing house unless you are wealthy (or a politician). Do you want to spend your hard-earned money for ‘I’m published’ gleam in your eye? The real sparkle is in their eyes: the scratch in your pocket. Oh, get your mind out of that gutter. Money.

 

Here it is:

You’ve completed the manuscript. That is an endeavor. And a half.

pen and sword

 

Determine your budget for every step of this endeavor listed. I cannot stress this enough. Encourage an elephant to sit on you before you write checks. Have a look around for self-publishing groups.

What do you want to sell, e-books only? Consider Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/about/tos Or both e-books and paperback? I recommend both, but in the end, this is up to you. E-books are far less expensive but bring fewer royalties (though I have heard some great success stories). Smashwords gives you about 70-85% of royalties… though you pay 35 cents per book sold. This royalty number is awesome. You keep copyright, and can participate in other parts of the program. Well worth the look. Your biggest obstacle with ebooks is the dearth of readers who are aghast at any work requiring more than 99 cents.

 pay writers ha

 

Set a time goal. Six months before your novel is ready for printing, start your online advertising. Tell your friends. Get the word out. You are Wonder Woman. Or Superman. Pick one.

      Wonder_Woman                              superman          

 

Plan a marketing program. Let’s talk cost. Squish your toes in social media. Make it sexy. If you don’t have a website, fer cryin’ out loud, get one. WordPress blogs are free. Their websites cha-ching your pocket from one hundred to five thousand dollars. A domain name will cost from ten dollars to one hundred. Go Daddy and others will offer for a fee, SEO (search engine optimization) to improve visibility.

marketing

Some custom websites charge ten times that amount.

Facebook fan page. Love this. If you want advertising on your Facebook fan page advertising costs, but nominal. Twitter is free. With WordPress blog free, you can post to Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter… you get the idea. You can find free or pay for website services. I went cheap. As in, starving-artist-free: http://cmahoneyfnp.wixsite.com/claireosullivan a DIY site. 

 

ISBN number. You must have one for your novel. That’s the little barcode on the back so you get paid. CreateSpace offers one free, however it remains with them … forever. You can also purchase one for one hundred dollars or more.

 

ISBN.png

Get your murder hat on. Why do I mention this here in your goals? You want your book to sell I suspect. So, slash those scenes like Dexter in a bad mood, those that don’t push the plot along. Some self-publishing businesses will not pass three-hundred-eighty pages. Paying for editors is not cheap. Pretend for a second your novel is five hundred pages. You want to pay said editor a zillion buckaroos for pages to be removed, and edited… again? How do you spell redrum? Editors often charge thirty to forty dollars per hour. Your team of readers/critique buds can help with murder. One with the vase. One with the rug. One with the shovel.

kill em offer

 

The cover. I know you already have a cover in mind. Now find an artist/photographer to design, or look at stock photos, you can pay a lot or minimal. On my website, I have stock images I want on my new works. Some folks have luck with fivver, a less-expensive method. Fivver is a conglomeration of people who will work in five-dollar increments. Ask your Facebook fans which cover mock-up they like best.

CreateSpace offers free front/back and spine flaps with limited covers, though you can upload your own. When they create a cover for you, now you are looking at over three hundred dollars. I changed one book’s title and cover three times… that’s a buncha clams if you switch from one picture or another through custom artists. Keep that in mind. This was my second free cover (which I liked), another DIY on CreateSpace. The Big However… upon beginning the first chapter as a reader, I realized my fiction (and title) didn’t fit the cover—the formatting was fine. Don’t bother looking for it, the cover never moved passed the proofing stage. Sigh. Looks lovely, though. Keeping it for my next book.

CreateSpace is an easy platform that offers eBooks and paperback. They do the hard work such as bookbinding. They will gently place your work on Amazon, Kindle, Barnes and Noble, and it’s ready. Amazon Publishing is not currently accepting unsolicited manuscripts, but this is their site: https://amazonpublishing.amazon.com/work-with-us .

Preview your work online. Order five book drafts if in paperback. Most self-publishing requires a minimum. CreateSpace requires five. When you receive the box, shout with glee, review it, and bust out the champagne (or beverage of choice). I have declined some first copies and reformatted. No they don’t give you your money back. Rats. Each print-on-demand book through CreateSpace costs three dollars and ten cents. Minus shipping and handling.

Social media blitz and marketing. Put pictures of the books, a box of books in fact, onto every social media site you have. Plug to your friends, and now, family (they don’t count early on). Take the box you’ve ordered to local bookstores. Go to signings wherever you can find them. Authors Innovative Marketing on Facebook is chockfull of ideas for authors. Post your novel on Goodreads. Don’t forget! Put a PayPal button click on your website, and your Facebook fan page-

social media

 

Before you think the endeavor is beyond you, it’s not. Royalties may be great: but read the contract with a jaundiced eye. Not … really jaundiced, but … Consider the amount you will pay for twenty-five books, print-on-demand. Three-dollars per book. Consider shipping/handling and your profit and loss.

So check around. Self-publishing sites that are true self-publishing sites are tough to find. Vanity and boutique presses, shrouded vaguely, tell you the cost for purchasing a package and then sink their teeth in your pocketbook like Monty Python’s savage attack bunny… “Run away, run away!

monty python

            If you are interested in Indie publishing, the larger Indies (for independent, not East Indian) pay well. And do not make fun. I thought that’s what Indie meant… hey, it was a long time ago, yeesh.

 

https://www.myidentifiers.com/Get-your-isbn-now ISBN site

 

This is Diggypod. I don’t consider these folks self-publish but you may get some ideas: https://www.diggypod.com/self-publishing/companies/

 

Here is CreateSpace, and I do recommend taking a look: https://www.createspace.com/

Post your books on https://www.goodreads.com/

 

And … a list of the top Indie publishers: https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/publisher-news/article/73281-fast-growing-independent-publishers-2017.html

Here you have it. Goals for your journey to self-publishing.

I been away. oops.

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Whoops. Been quiet. Sorry.

December 3, 2017

Goodness. I disappeared for some time. YEP. I’ve stuck my nose into editing/rewriting/editing/rewriting Forget Me Not: Non Compos Mentis. In this heinous process, I MEAN, wonderful process … yeesh, I realize the title is no longer relevant to my story. The protagonist’s obstacle has changed. That’s ’cause the ‘original’ antagonist is different …

PHTTP.

So, I am fiddling with some new ideas. If you have any suggestions do let me know. Thus far my favorite is The Nobody Girl. Or, simply Nobody Girl.

Thoughts?

Shocker!

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minion

It’s done. Forget Me Not in paper form has been edited, reworked. Champagne? Maybe. Maybe not. Gives me a headache. So Sparkling Apple Cider works. Or anything chocolate-y.

 

If you’ve read my previous posts on this subject, you’ll know that I am dumbfounded with the ease of filling plot holes, rewording, and slashing unimportant scenes.

 

So.. uh, what I said. It isn’t a bad idea. I will do this for future works. But I’ll need an industrial-sized paper hole puncher, and bigger three ring binders…

 

Now it’s in a binder (a bit tight), but will be easier to fiddle with while I lovingly place my changes onto the computer version. I only wonder, how long will that process take?

 

While I kick back, eat a slice of cake, it’s time to head to the books I have put aside.

 

cake

 

Um. So I changed my mind. Sort of.

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confused

 

Wait, what?

 

Sure, go ahead. Make fun. I screamed after printing the manuscript. What a horrible idea! I said…

 

Okay, so, maybe… just a bit… I may have changed my mind.

 

Not entirely. But. The good  news is, I can flip back and forth between page, plop sticky notes on what I perceive to be plot holes, or in need of plot thickeners…

 

Pull out red pen … reword some Phuzzy Phrases. Scenes that fizzle. Sentences that suck. Aren’t needed. Don’t push the plot along. Hasta Lumbago, paragraph of doom, palabras de muerte (Yes, lumbago intended…).

 

arnold going ape

 

 

Then when my inner Arnold is done, I’ll go back and plug the puppy into the eReader. Then plop it into a Beta group. Then, off to an editor, or grammar Nazi … I know a few…

 

Writing is rewriting. Then, some more rewriting. And … repeat.

 

Something outstanding in the mix happened. That whole ‘are you actually working…?’ question mark that occasionally crosses my husband’s face contorted into a Holy * moment. Nonchalantly, I said … this is what continues on and on until each. word. fits.

 

So for kicks and giggles, I pulled out different colored pens, markers and marked all over it, and now he really is impressed with the amount of work. I have just now become the Jason Bourne of dedication.

 

jason bourne gif

 

Yay, me.  Off to the salt mines…